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has enough money to hire a new assistant and he hires a promising young man from boston and he teaches them how to be a journalist and report about slavery and the great irony they would want to die in obscurity and he would go on to become the most famous abolitionist editor and one of the most influential american journalists of the 19th book, too. you probably think the only important thing that he did in his life is write the lyrics to the star spangled banner. he went into an interesting career in politics which is completely unknown to most people she was the modern washington character after he became famous in 1814 for writing the star spangled banner he did what people in washington usually do and he parlayed his fame into a lucrative practice and the political connection into jobs in the of the culmination of francis scott key's in 1833 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time i wouldn't say that was as significant as right in the star spangled banner which was obviously an enduring bet but it was really important.
in boston, it's anyone's choice, but it is that event in some ways that we go back to. now, james baldwin, i had great time writing this book, but i just wrote about the writers that just wanted to write about it, quoting them, end graphs, just using them for years until i finally decided i'm going to write about them and see what shape the book takes. baldwin, to me, is the most revealing. i'd always basically just quoted him, plucked passages as we all do. baldwin the essayist. baldwin, the nonfiction voice of the civil rights movement is something everyone should go back to revisit. in the collection, nobody knows my name, or in the collection, previous non-fiction collections or most famously, baldwin made himself the voice that was constantly, constantly asking why can't americans remember slavery? why don't they want to face their history with racism, why don't they want to look back at the emancipation process, why won't they look back at reconstruction? why won't they? he does it in the interview with baldwin, in the quick silver, you know, quick fire, quick method in appealing an un
that get america back to work in $300 billion in revenue with boston recession. it commits to spending levels for democrats and republicans agree to together. the fact of the matter is there's too much partisanship in d.c. this is an opportunity to come together and i'm disappointed by it upon it while sinai. >> host: we are going to turn it over to casey seiler nonprint questions from viewers at home. >> we've received a number of questions. as the party hurt, this is a time of great partisan division. @bruce tuchman who asks, in your time in politics, name one significant achievement was the result of working with a member of the opposite party appeared schriebman: i do situation where right leadership is going to zero to low-interest loan program for broadband. i thought that was a big mistake and i went and said we need this program here in upstate new york. it helps create jobs, health care delivery and education. they said we've made up our mind. we're going to zero this out. i said i'm going to bring an amendment to the florida house of representatives were going to overturn thi
will have coverage of obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. we are focused on some of the more competitive senate seats. plus, your reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern. next we take you to arizona for u.s. senate debate between republican jeff flake and democratic candidate richard carmona. they are vying for the senate seat left open by jon kyl. courtesy of kawc radio. >> welcome to the debate on the campus on school of arizona, yuma. we will begin with 92nd opening statements from jeff flake and trento. they will take questions from a panel of journalists related to life outside the metropolitan areas. built into the schedule is an additional four minutes, should the moderator or panelists have a follow-up. we have news director anna chaulk, joyce lobeck and michelle faust. joining us today are over 300 residents. they have agreed to respect the candidates and listened silently during the debate with the exception of right now. ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome congressman jeff flake and doctor r
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4